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Some runners don’t like hill running because it’s, well, hard. But running hills provides a lot of benefits to runners, so don’t shy away from them. Here are some of the ways you can benefit from hill running:

You’ll build strength.
Running inclines, either on a hill outdoors or on a treadmill, is a form of resistance training that builds up the muscles in your calves, quads, hamstrings, and glutes. Hill running strengthens those areas more than running on flat ground. You’ll also strengthen your hip flexors and Achilles tendons.
You’ll get faster.
The muscles you’ll use to run up hills are the same ones used for sprinting, so the strength you build will improve your speed.
You won’t get bored.
If you’re used to running on mostly flat courses, adding hills to your routines can help prevent boredom.
You’ll reduce your risk of injuries.
As you strengthen your leg muscles through hill running, you considerably reduce the risk of suffering from running-related injuries.
You’ll strengthen your upper body.
Uphill running forces you to drive your arms harder than you do when running on flat ground, so you’ll improve your upper body strength.
You’ll build confidence.
The more you run hills, the less intimidating they’ll seem when you encounter them on a race course. Your improved strength and technique on the hills will definitely give you a confidence boost when you’re racing.

Here is some hill workouts I found:
10-Second Hill Sprints

At the end of a 20- to 40-minute easy run, find a steep hill (six to eight percent grade). Run two 10-second repeats. Add one repeat per week until you reach eight. Do the first repeat at a fast but controlled pace; the rest at top speed. Recover after each repeat for at least two minutes by walking downhill backward. Stay at eight repeats for two to four weeks, then take two weeks off from hill running before starting the cycle again.

Longer Hill Repeats

Every two or three weeks, replace your weekly hill sprints with this workout: 20 to 40 minutes of easy running, finishing at a medium-steep slope (five to six percent grade). Do 4 x 30-second hill repeats at the fastest pace that you can maintain good form, gradually progressing to 60-, then 90-, then 120-second repeats. Walk downhill after each repetition for a total rest of at least two minutes.

Uphill Tempo

Schedule a four-week block about 10 weeks before your target race for this series of challenging tempo runs. Do a one- to two-mile warmup before each workout. Week one: Run uphill (on a three or four percent grade) for 20 minutes at a moderate pace. Week two: Increase the tempo time to 30 minutes at a moderate pace. Week three: Pull back to 20 minutes, but increase your pace to a speed that’s hard but you’re (pretty) sure you can hold. Week four: Hold that hard pace for 30 minutes. No long hills nearby? Break the tempo time into 10- and 15-minute segments, or use a treadmill.

Hill Training Tips
Start with an easy 15 minute warmup on rolling hills
Take your time. Do not exceed your training level.
Good hill running form Run with a slightly higher knee lift
Pump arms viourously
Lean slightly forward
Keep head up
Cool down with a 15 minute jog on level or gently rolling ground.
Jog slowly on each decent.
If you want to run hills on a treadmill, for each change in altitude, run at a 8 percent incline for 90 to 90 seconds with 2 minutes flat recovery jogs.
Do not hill train when you are injured

I recommend only doing this once a week!

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